Tag Archives: Unbound Festival of New Works

Possokhov and Scarlett bring two world premieres to the SFB stage

With The Sleeping Beauty all wrapped up at the War Memorial Opera House, it’s officially the halfway point for San Francisco Ballet’s 2019 repertory season. Last season’s Unbound: A Festival of New Works (which I blogged about HERE) gave the company twelve world premieres, several of which are being repeated this season. But 2019 brings its own two world premieres, which are forthcoming, in Programs 5 and 6.

Program 5, “Lyric Voices,” which runs March 27 through April 7, features the world premiere of Yuri Possokhov’s “. . . two united in a single soul . . .” It’s choreographer-in-residence Possokhov’s 15th work created for the San Francisco Ballet, and he’s drawn from the Greek myth of Narcissus, the hunter who falls in love with his own reflection in a forest spring and wastes away, pining for unattainable love. Possokhov, whose work for the San Francisco Ballet includes The Rite of Spring, Firebird and Swimmer, utilizes thirteen dancers, including Narcissus, who explore moments of connection, reflection and refraction.

Wei Wang and Joseph Walsh rehearsing Possokhov’s “. . . two united in a single soul . . .”. (© Erik Tomasson)

The ballet’s music holds its own allure to me. Possokhov commissioned a score by Russian composer Daria Novo, who has fused arias by Handel—performed live, in rotation, by countertenors Aryeh Nussbaum Cohen and Matheus Coura—with electronic elements (audio plug-ins, libraries, sound effects) and her own music. The music, the countertenors, might sound surprisingly familiar to some. Remember that 1994 movie, Farinelli, a biographical drama about the 18th-century castrato Carlo Broschi?

Countertenors are today’s equivalent to the famous castrati (do I need to translate what makes them sing so high?) of the 17th and 18th centuries, and Possokhov cites the music from Farinelli as further inspiration for his ballet. “It’s the combination of the dancing and the singing that I love so much. I knew I wanted voice, and I’m fond of countertenors. The ballet is set nowhere; it’s just space-somewhere, somehow. And the voice is like the echo in the myth.”

“Lyric Voices” also includes two ballets returning from last year’s Unbound Festival. They are Trey McIntyre’s Your Flesh Shall Be a Great Poem and Christopher Wheeldon’s Bound To. Additional information about the program can be found on San Francisco Ballet’s website, in its Discover section. Dates run Wed March 27  to Sun April 7 (concurrent with Program 6). Tickets start at $32 and may be purchased via the Ticket Services Office at 415 865 2000, Monday through Friday from 10 am to 4 pm or online at www.sfballet.org.

I can’t stop thinking about the music from Farinelli –– it’s a favorite soundtrack of mine. I have a hunch Possokhov’s ballet will include the gorgeous “Lascia Ch’io Pianga” from Handel’s Rinaldo, so to get you in the mood, here you go, something for my ballet readers and classical music readers alike.

And now about the World Premiere for Program 6, Liam Scarlett’s Die Toteninsel. It, too, includes a stunning, memorable work of classical music, Rachmaninoff’s “The Isle of the Dead.” Die Toteninsel is its German translation, and is also the name of the iconic painting by Swiss Symbolist artist Arnold Böcklin (see the embed below). Rachmaninoff’s symphonic tone poem, like the painting, is stirring and spooky and amazing; it made the list for my “10 Spooky Classical Faves for Halloween” post, which you can find HERE.

English choreographer Scarlett, artist in residence at The Royal Ballet, has created other memorable works for The San Francisco Ballet: Hummingbird, Fearful Symmetries and Frankenstein. Similar to the latter, Die Toteninsel exhibits the darkness and uneasy qualities of beauty (or, paradoxically, the beautiful qualities of darkness and unease). As Caitlin Sims explains in program notes, Scarlett uses the music and its history as a jumping off point for a more abstract work exploring the deep-rooted questions about what lies beyond this life. If Scarlett’s Frankenstein was a choreographic novel, his new ballet is more a short story—in which symbolism, movement motifs, and ambiguity both color the work and give viewers room to make diverse, individual interpretations.

Liam Scarlett and Davide Occhipinti rehearsing Scarlett’s Die Toteninsel. (© Erik Tomasson)

Scarlett draws upon the music’s repetitiveness and its unique 5/8 time signature in creating movement that grows and builds, then unexpectedly echoes itself. As a central couple emerges, surging forward and sweeping back in great arcs, their movements are reflected by groups that form and dissipate as easily as waves, giving the ephemeral “a sense of weight, and passing through one another,” says Scarlett.

Give the music a listen. It’s stunning. And the image, by the way, is the famous painting.

Also featured in Program 6 are Justin Peck’s 2015 Rodeo: Four Dances and Arthur Pita’s Björk Ballet (from last year’s Unbound Festival). Additional information about the program can be found on San Francisco Ballet’s website, in its Discover section. Dates run Friday March 29  to Tuesday April 9 (concurrent with Program 5). Tickets start at $32 and may be purchased via the Ticket Services Office at 415 865 2000, Monday through Friday from 10 am to 4 pm or online at www.sfballet.org.

SFB’s Unbound: a Festival of New Works

Looking for The Classical Girl’s review of Program B? Here you go! www.bachtrack.com

Prepare yourself, dance world. San Francisco Ballet’s Unbound, a festival featuring twelve new works, is about to land in San Francisco. And it’s going to be big. An unprecedented, mind-expanding, creatively explosive extravaganza that includes the following:

  • Twelve internationally acclaimed choreographers
  • Four programs running through seventeen days
  • Twelve world premieres
  • Glorious, fresh, neoclassical ballet
  • Boldly inventive experimental ballet
  • Music that runs the gamut from classical to electronica
  • An affiliated symposium open to the public
  • Choreographer interviews and rehearsals archived to watch at your convenience

Curious about programs, dates, a sneak peek? You came to the right place! First the sneak peek…


Now onto the programs…

Program A
Sculpted space. Digital dependency. Classicism in sneakers. Three unique voices offer three distinct takes on where ballet’s headed. 

  • THE COLLECTIVE AGREEMENT – Choreographer: Alonzo King; Composer: Jason Moran
  • BOUND TO© – Choreographer: Christopher Wheeldon; Composer: Keaton Henson
  • HURRY UP, WE’RE DREAMING Choreographer: Justin Peck; Composers: Anthony Gonzalez, Yann Gonzalez, Bradley Laner, and Justin Meldal-Johnsen

Dates: Fri Apr 20, 8pm; Sun Apr 22, 2pm; Sat Apr 28, 8pm; Thu May 3, 7:30pm; Sun May 6, 2pm

Program B
Groupthink. Tragic passion. Opposing energy. Three innovative thinkers examine the ties that bind and the differences that distinguish.

  • OTHERNESS – Choreographer: Myles Thatcher; Composer: John Adams
  • SNOWBLIND – Choreographer: Cathy Marston; Composers: Amy Beach, Philip Feeney, Arthur Foote, and Arvo Pärt. Music Arranger: Philip Feeney
  • ANIMA ANIMUS – Choreographer: David Dawson; Composer: Ezio Bosso

Dates: Sat, Apr 21, 8pm; Wed, Apr 25, 7:30pm; Sun, Apr 29, 2pm; Fri, May 4, 8pm

Program C
The ephemeral in the eternal. Family heritage. Savage beauty. Three artists move forward while drawing from the past.

  • BESPOKE – Choreographer: Stanton Welch; Composer: Johann Sebastian Bach
  • YOUR FLESH SHALL BE A GREAT POEM – Choreographer: Trey McIntyre; Composer: Chris Garneau
  • GUERNICA – Choreographer: Annabelle Lopez Ochoa; Composers: Joe Andrews, Michel Banabila, Tom Halstead, and Charles Valentin-Alkan

Dates: Tue, Apr 24, 7:30pm; Fri, Apr 27, 8pm; Wed, May 2, 7:30pm; Sat, May 5, 2pm

Program D
The space between life and death. Passionate connectivity. The music of Björk. Three dancemakers evoke the spiritual connections that span life and death, the beauty and pain in relationships, and a surrealist dream ballet. 

  • THE INFINITE OCEAN – Choreographer: Edwaard Liang; Composer: Oliver Davis
  • LET’S BEGIN AT THE END – Choreographer: Dwight Rhoden; Composers: Johann Sebastian Bach, Philip Glass, and Michael Nyman
  • BJÖRK BALLET – Choreographer: Arthur Pita; Composers: Björk Gudmundsdottir and Sjón

Dates: Thu, Apr 26, 7:30pm; Sat, Apr 28, 2pm; Tue, May 1, 7:30pm; Sat, May 5, 8pm

Boundless: A Symposium on Ballet’s Future
Bringing together noted artists, scholars, and critics, this event provides an opportunity for discussion, debate, and collaboration about ballet in the 21st century.

Dates: April 27-29th. Details and times can be found HERE.

Unbound Live Highlights
Clips from past live stream productions that give you a behind-the-scenes look at the Unbound ballets being rehearsed, featuring interviews and excerpts of choreography.

Dates: Anytime, right HERE

Now. Ready to see some gorgeous dance films? Each one was inspired by a new work from Unbound. All are original short films that bear the name of their world premiere ballet.

Cathy Marston’s Snowblind

Snowblind “was inspired by Edith Wharton’s novella ‘Ethan Frome.'” Director: Mark Kohr; Choreographer: Cathy Marston; Producer: Jesus Peña; Music: 2 Piano Pieces, Op. 62, No. 2 Exaltation by Arthur Foote, Arranged by Philip Feeney; Director of Photography: Steve Condotti; Editor: Mark Kohr; Dancers: Mathilde Froustey, Sarah Van Patten, Ulrik Birkkjaer

Dwight Rhoden’s LET’S BEGIN AT THE END

LET’S BEGIN AT THE END  Director: Matthew Mckee; Choreographer: Dwight Rhoden; Producers: Christine Busby & Steve Condotti; Music: Michael Nyman; Director of Photography: Joe Lindsay; Editor: Matthew Mckee; Dancers: Frances Chung, Sasha De Sola, Jennifer Stahl, Ulrik Birkkjaer, Benjamin Freemantle, Angelo Greco, Esteban Hernandez

Alonzo King’s The Collective Agreement

The Collective Agreement Director: Kate Duhamel; Producer: Jesus Peña; Choreographer: Alonzo King; Music: “The Collective Agreement,” written, published, and performed by Jason Moran; Director of Photography: Jesse Eisenhardt; Editor: Kate Duhamel; Visual Effects Artist: Brandon McFarland; Dancers: Sofiane Sylve, Tiit Helimets, Max Cauthorn, Jahna Frantziskonis, James Sofranko, Anna Sophia Scheller, Solomon Golding

Annabelle Lopez Ochoa’s Guernica

Guernica “found inspiration in the art of Picasso.” Director: Kate Duhamel; Choreographer: Annabelle Lopez Ochoa; Music: “Jump Cuts” written, published, and performed by Michel Banabila; Director of Photography: Heath Orchard; Editor: Kate Duhamel; Visual Effects Artist: Brandon McFarland; Dancers: Dores Andre, Solomon Golding, Julia Rowe, Myles Thatcher

Tickets are going fast for this amazing event, so don’t wait too long! To check dates, pricing and availability online, go HERE. (Choose the program and dates you’re considering, and click on “tickets” in lower right hand of screen.) Otherwise you can call the San Francisco Ballet ticket office at (415) 865 2000, Monday through Friday, between 10 am and 4 pm, Pacific Time. (On performance nights, the phone lines will remain open until showtime.)

Hope to see you there!

National Ballet of Canada & Neumeier’s “Nijinsky” come to San Francisco

The National Ballet of Canada in Neumeier’s Nijinsky.
(© Bruce Zinger) guest company

“The National Ballet of Canada’s production of John Neumeier’s Nijinsky is a triumph on all fronts.”
— Canada’s The Globe and Mail

While the San Francisco Ballet keeps busy in preparation for its epic *Unbound New Works Festival, with its twelve exciting new commissions, the stage at the War Memorial Opera House gets turned over to The National Ballet of Canada and their presentation of John Neumeier’s  Nijinsky. Watching this preview of Neumeier’s masterpiece, all I can say is, “Oh, wow. Give me more. And more!” Take a look for yourself.

Choreographer John Neumeier is the longtime artistic director of the Hamburg Ballet, on whom he set this ballet in 2000. Not only is Neumeier one of contemporary ballet’s most important voices, he is a world authority on the life and work of Vaslav Nijinsky, having maintained a lifelong interest in the artist. The National Ballet of Canada’s website shares this about the charismatic Nijinsky who stunned and entranced audiences for a brief ten years before retiring from the stage at age twenty-nine. “Renowned for his unforgettable stage presence, his astonishing technique and his groundbreaking approach to choreographic expression, Nijinsky shattered for all time not just the prevailing notions and expectations of the male dancer, but the limitations that convention had imposed on the range of dramatic possibilities in dance itself.”

Neumeier’s ballet draws from several aspects of Nijinsky’s life, presented in a meditative, non-linear fashion, that ultimately reflects the madness that will come to consume him. The ballet’s opening scene is set just after WW I in a hotel in St. Moritz, Switzerland, where the real-life Nijinsky offered the audience his final performance as a dancer. Through this, we, the other audience, become privy to the man’s memories, his genius, his choreography, important relationships and life events, premonitions, and the madness that seemed to have taken over the world, as well.

Guillaume Côté in Neumeier’s Nijinsky.
(© Erik Tomasson) guest company

The music accompanying the production, for my classical music enthusiast readers out there,  features Chopin’s Prélude in C minor, the first movement of Schumann’s Faschingsschwank aus Wien, Rimsky-Korsakov’s sumptuous  Schéhérazade (Movements I, III and IV), the “Adagio” movement from Shostakovich’s Sonata for Viola and Piano, as well as his Symphony No. 11.

Here’s what critics are saying about the production:

  • “A triumph of dramatic intensity… the National Ballet rises to the challenge of presenting John Neumeier’s Nijinsky, a spectacular, sprawling, surreal and often mind-bending homage to ballet’s most legendary male dancer.” — Toronto Star
  • Nijinsky soars to intense heights… a richly detailed production” — National Post
  • “Under the enlightened and demanding direction of Karen Kain, former great international ballet star, the company has earned its place at the highest level, enriching its repertory considerably by collaborating with the greatest choreographers of our time” — Danses Avec La Plume

Here is National Ballet of Canada dancer Félix Paquet explaining about what’s required from him as he portrays Nijinsky as the Faun and the Golden Slave, both iconic Nijinsky roles that are featured in Neumeier’s ballet. it’s fascinating and informative to watch.

Interested in going? Here are some details for you:

Where?  War Memorial Opera House, 301 Van Ness, San Francisco
When?   April 3 to 8, 2018, 7 performances total
How?    
Purchase tickets online HERE or call (415) 865-2000
Run Time  2 hours, 25 minutes, with one intermission

Principal casting for the San Francisco dates of the production has been announced!  

Vaslav Nijinsky
Guillaume Côté (April 3, 6 at 7:30 pm/April 8 at 2:00 pm)
Skylar Campbell (April 4 at 7:30 pm/April 7 at 2:00 pm)
Francesco Gabriele Frola (April 5 at 7:30 pm/April 7 at 7:30 pm)

Romola Nijinsky
Heather Ogden (April 3 at 7:30 pm/April 8 at 2:00 pm)
Sonia Rodriguez (April 4 at 7:30 pm/April 7 at 2:00 pm)
Svetlana Lunkina (April 5, 7 at 7:30 pm)
Xiao Nan Yu (April 6 at 7:30 pm)

Serge Diaghilev
Ben Rudisin (April 3, 6 at 7:30 pm/April 8 at 2:00 pm)
Piotr Stanczyk (April 4, 5, 7 at 7:30 pm/April 7 at 2:00 pm)

Casting is subject to change

* San Francisco Ballet’s Unbound: a Festival of New Works  is a ground-breaking celebration of innovation within ballet, featuring twelve new commissions and world premieres, taking place in four programs, April 20 to May 6, 2018. Want to know more? Here’s a preview from the San Francisco Chronicle. For further information or to order tickets, go HERE.

Just as my last blog, “Debussy’s ‘Afternoon of a Faun,'” offered a teaser of this blog and this program at the San Francisco War Memorial Opera House, I can’t resist ending this with a teaser of San Francisco Ballet’s forthcoming Unbound extravaganza. It’s going to be an amazing two weeks, chock full of amazing, innovative ballet. The following is a photo shoot that features the company’s dancers in poses from featured Unbound works that photographer Erik Tomasson turns into stunning art. Check it out!